Invasive Plant Fermenting with Sagohachizuke – Christine Krauss




Women and Koji Making

Women and Koji Making: June 15, 2020: 9:00 AM EDT to 5:30 PM EDT
(2 Sessions) A complete description of who and what is incuded here



Jessica Alonzo with Petra and The Beast



Part of the Women and Sake Making Sessions

Women and Koji Making

Women and Koji Making: June 15, 2020: 9:00 AM EDT to 5:30 PM EDT
(2 Sessions) A complete description of who and what is incuded here



Petra and The Beast



Part of the Women and Sake Making Sessions

Women and Koji Making

Women and Koji Making: June 15, 2020: 9:00 AM EDT to 5:30 PM EDT
(2 Sessions) A complete description of who and what is incuded here



Sake Kasu


Part of the Women and Sake Making Sessions



Women and Koji Making

Women and Koji Making: June 15, 2020: 9:00 AM EDT to 5:30 PM EDT
(2 Sessions) A complete description of who and what is incuded here



Sweet Potato Koji Vinegar


Part of the Women and Sake Making Sessions
Sweet Potato Vinegar for the Women and Koji Making Event (over 60 hours in case you need to space it out!). And you can make great vinegar from bodaimoto type country sake also called doburoko.

Vinegars seem to multiply like rabbits around here. We’ve been trying to recreate several dozen recipes for vinegars from thousands of years ago using beans and grains and roots. They are very tasty, and add something very special to just about anything.

Women and Koji Making

Women and Koji Making: June 15, 2020: 9:00 AM EDT to 5:30 PM EDT
(2 Sessions) A complete description of who and what is incuded here



Cilantro and Mustard Seed Pickle


See The Kimchi Method video for the treatment of cabbage and other vegetables for fermentation or picking. Otherwise, salt down your quartered green, leafy nappa cabbage for about 4 hours and squeeze out very well. Follow the recipe below. Make sure to toast the mustard seeds in the mustard oil until just about smoking. If it is smoking, pour it into a heat resistant container as quickly as possible while removing from the heat. Put the hot pan in a cool place, but not near water or an open flame.




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Mushroom and Dried Shrimp Kimchi


We used Alex’s dried Hen of the Woods mushrooms, and some dried red shrimp we always have on hand to make my favorite kimchi. The technique is pretty well described in the video class on fermenting using the kimchi technique below.

We are assuming you watched the previous short intro video to treating cabbage for kimchi.


  • 1 Medium sized green, leafy nappa cabbage or about 1 1/2 pounds to 2 1/2 pounds
  • 2/3 cup or 20 grams dried red shrimp
  • 2 teaspoons or 5 grams pan roasted black peppercorns
  • 5 to 8 cloves garlic cloves or 36 grams
  • 1/2 cup or 50 grams coarse salt for pre-treating cabbage
  • 1 cup Hen of the Woods Mushrooms, soaked briefly in the juice of the cabbage (see video)
  • 2 tsp coarse sea salt

Chef Ken Fornataro demonstrating the kimchi technique, applicable to hundreds of other types of pickles.

You could use red pepper flakes if you like. You could also omit the shrimp and use fish sauce, or even a little soy sauce with another mushroom. You could even use candied ginger if you can’t get any fresh ginger. It’s excellent!

But this is absolutely my favorite combination of ingredients, especially with the delicate young ginger and roasted black peppercorns. Ready in seven days, too.

It will leak out of the jar without a container underneath it. Make sure the bowl or whatever you use to catch the spill over is as clean as the jar so you can put the juice right back in and rinse off the jar and bowl. Great way to catch the bacteria and yeasts you want in your kimchi.

Also, this gives off very much less strong odors that a full on fermented shrimp and hot pepper based kimchi. on’t worry, we’ll post some unique recipes for that type as well.



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Making Koji Flour, Controlling Water

We have thousands of videos we want to share and hundreds of thousands of videos, but to what end? Information changes so quickly that trying to keep up with it prevents people from learning from each other, let alone even listening.

So, we’re going through them all and only posting the ones we think are useful now and in the next year at the very least.

If you have a specific question after you watch one of our videos or read one of our posts, please ask. We will distill your questions into compact, easy to understand posts and videos as best we can.

This video is about the role of water in chemical and other enzymatic reactions. In other words, knowing how to manipulate the water content of food on a macro or very microscopic level is the key to preserving food, fermenting food, cooking food or just preparing it to ingest it.

Hopefully, the videos will help you to see how we apply our knowledge of both science and cooking to create great tasting foods and beverages. The only thing you won’t learn about here is how to buy something we make or write.

Check out these new videos!

Contact through the following means, or join our MeetUp or Facebook group.

Truffle Fritters


Truffle flecked chicken fritter.
A light colored seitan (wheat meat or plant protein) – don’t stew it in soy sauce – also works incredibly well in this recipe.

  • 1 1/2 pounds or 680 grams boneless chickens thighs or breasts cut into pieces
  • 1/2 cup or 112 grams truffle shio-koji (or mince a truffle or dried mushroom into shio-koji)

Marinate the chicken in the truffle shio-koji for two hours. Add the ingredients below to the chicke and marinate again for 2 hours.


In the meantime we started wilting spinach – use whatever greens, including alfalfa and corn sprouts, that you have – with a tablespoon of very finely minced preserved lemon to serve with the fritters. You don’t need oil for this salad if serving with the fritters.

  • 3/4 cup or 118 grams sake
  • 1 egg or 56 grams

Chicken bathing in sake and truffle shio-koji

Rub the sake and egg into the chicken, blending it together with the truffle shio-koji. Marinate for another hour. Wipe off the chicken as best as you can into the bowl with marinade. Try to save ever last drop of the marinade.


  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup or 184 grams all purpose flour or corn flour
  • 1 tsp coarse sea salt
  • Oil for frying (about 4 cups)

Mix the baking powder, salt, and flour together. Add to the reserved marinade. It will be pretty thick at this point. Dip the chicken pieces in this and let them sit for as long as you like in the fridge. Or fry immediately. Try and get batter on each piece of chicken as you slide it into the heated oil.

Add the chicken a piece at a time while turning up the heat for just a few seconds until you get half of the chicken in the oil. You need to make this in two batches (or cut the recipe in half). After the first batch skim the oil well, removing any browned bits.



Make sure the pieces are not sticking to the pan. Shake the pan very gently or give them a little push with your tongs or chop sticks

These will cook and brown very fast so turn them over after two minutes at medium high heat. Then let them fry for another 2 minutes at best. Remove from the oil and let drain if you don’t serve them right away on a bowl of rice or another grain or mashed celery root (celeriac).

I typically have a second pan waiting to heat the oil up for a second batch, after I strain the oil through a very fine mesh strainer.


Fine Mesh Oil Skimmer/Strainer. Also works very well to strain gallons of tea made with loose leaves, or even a soy sauce or shoyu after a first bulk straining.

If you don’t serve this right away, or eat it all chill it overnight in the fridge and eat it cold with a truffle oil mayonnaise, or a simple mild vinegar based vinaigrette.

This is also a great way to make a fast chicken parmiggiano. Place whatever type of cheeses you like over the chicken – truffled cheese, mozzarella, parmesan or even Gruyere or Emmental heat in a 400F oven for 15 minutes.

Also, if you don’t have truffles or mushrooms, shred some perilla or shiso leaves into the shio koji before adding the sake and egg. You could also use milk kefir, buttermilk, chicken stock or cold miso soup instead of the sake. You could also use a light colored seitan or other plant protein – just don’t stew it in soy sauce – instead of the chicken.


五味 – The Five Flavors

The taste of Sour is associated with Spring (and one of the five elements, Wood).  Sour foods are said to be good for the liver and gall bladder. Vinegar, sauerkraut and other lactofermented foods, citrus fruits, and sourdough bread are classified as sour foods. 

Chef Ken Fornataro will discuss food and beverages based on the principles of five elements traditional Chinese medicine, and the five tastes. A specific organ or organ system of the human body is nourished by each of these tastes. Each taste has either warming or cooling energy, as well as a season.

Combining one or more of these tastes, like adding lemon or ginger to a piece of fried fish, creates compelling taste sensations while balancing the body’s energies. 

Ken’s Instagram virtual event on April 19th from 6 to 6:45 will include ways to create these flavors using cultures, alone or in combination:

  • Aspergillus (chhu or koji) and other filamentous fungus types grown on substrates including rice, millet, wheat, chocolate, mushrooms, seaweed, meats, fish, brans and bogassa
  • Rhizopus grown on rice, corn, fruits, fish, nuts, shellfish, squash, beans and other vegetables to make interesting fermented, preserved and inoculated foods and beverages such as #miso, baking flours, amino sauces and pastes, wines and other unique beverages.
  • Enzymes, Bacteria, Acids, and Yeasts, including malts, isolated out to create cultures to make functional and filling foods and beverages. For example, specific enzymes that come from koji can make doboroku, a country style sake, as well as barley malt or rice syrup.

Using these cultures, Ken will demonstrate how we create the five flavors by making five dishes that combine one or more of these cultures to make different types of kojis, misos, sauces, pastry and pickles.


  • Chocolate koji, corn, chipotle, and pickled onion mole
  • Peanut Koji and Sweet Shrimp Kecap Manis
  • Double fermented baked awasemiso
  • Tempeh and red pepper shoyu
  • White Soy Sauce with koji cured mushrooms

Ken Fornataro appearing at the Florida Fermentation Fest
We’ll have lots of recipes and additional videos at https://www.a-ray.tv/work-in-progress-cultured-cured and at https://Cultures.Group for those who send us their contact info including mailing address. Because you never know what really cool thing will arrive in the mail. 

Ken will demonstrate tasty, functional, medicinal, balancing, and strengthening food and beverages based on the principles of five elements traditional Chinese medicine, and the five tastes that have underlined all the worlds greatest cuisines for over ten thousand years. In combination, the above categories can create amazing, layered taste sensations.

Ken’s Instagram virtual event on April 19th from 6 to 6:45 presentation will briefly discuss:

  • Aspergillus (chhü or koji) and other filamentous fungus types grown on things (substrates) including rice, millet, wheat, chocolate, mushrooms, seaweed, meats, fish, brans, and bogassa to make fermented, preserved and inoculated foods, beverages, baked goods, pickles, sweets, and condiments.
  • Rhizopus grown on rice, corn, fruits, fish, nuts, shellfish, squash, beans, and other vegetables to make interesting fermented, preserved and inoculated foods and beverages such as tempeh, baking flours, misos, amino sauces and pastes, wines and other unique beverages.
  • Enzymes, Acids, Bacteria, and Yeasts, including malts, isolated out to create cultures to make functional and filling foods and beverages that are tasty as well as easier to make. For example, we’ll use specific amylase enzymes that come from rice koji to make doboroku, a country style sake. You could also just use the rice, but this is an example of the conveniences created by science.

Corn with A.sojae
Mixed Filamentous Fungus Corn Mochi Koji for Shoyu

As promised, we will further discuss the physiology of taste, and the receptors that influence how and how much we taste and smell, but also health. Combination therapy is the key. Properly balanced or combined as demonstrated in the food and drinks we describe, new flavors are unlocked, and new tasted are unbound. 

In the last 100 years spectacular advances in food microbiology have demonstrated how traditional techniques were well reasoned out. They worked in the context of the place they were made in. They provide a roadmap to adjust to ever changing resources and food supply and accessibility issues, climate change and cultural changes. 



We hope to be able to show you how to make many different types of koji, jiangs, soy sauce, shrimp miso, green tomatillo ketchup, koji and rhizopus cured coffee, manis kecap, tempeh flours, pickles, fruit and herb shrubs, malted sweets, and fermented chocolate breads. If we don’t have time, you’ll see recipes and hopefully videos for these very soon.

Always with an eye on affordability, accessibility and functionality. 


With
@sunshineandmicrobes
@hanihoneycompany
 @stpeteferments
@kirstenkshockey
@contrabandferments
@sarah_c_owens 
@sandorkraut
@fermentationonwheels
@theblacksheepschool
@goenfermentedfoods
@rgbpurafermentacion 
@zukemono
@kombuchakamp 
@rootkitchens
@awakenkombucha
@gystmpls
@culturesgroup
 @flyingboatbrewing