Ferments and Cultures – August 24th


Women and Koji Making II and Pickles. Register for August 24th Event: https://conta.cc/3fN85CW


There are 14 events that we will charge $35 per event to access the videos for seven days, and attend the live part or see an edited version of it.

To purchase a highly discounted Season Pass

* First tier Tickets: USD $157 until August 18 until at 11PM EST
* Second Tier Tickets USD $167 until August 29at 11 PM EST
* Third Tier Tickets USD $177 until 13 September 11PM EST

We don’t keep track of what events you attend. If you miss a specific event after the 7 day period you will not have access to the videos for that event.

We will not refund a partial amount of a Season Pass fee for any reason. After the entire events are over we hope to create a book and a documentary for sale that will benefit all the presenters and volunteer staff for the entire program.

August 24th event (starts August 22 online): https://conta.cc/3fN85CW


This program covers fermentation, preservation, increasing food resources, science, traditional and novel applications of microbes, food justice, soil development, farming, fungus and bacteria as environmental tools, waste management, land and water access and the preparation of food and drink through fermentation, preparation and cooking techniques. We recognize that some people are not actually interested in some of these topics, so we clearly make which videos are about fermentation, preparation and cooking techniques.

Event event has a specific focus often a geographic region that includes cultures, foods, drinks and techniques from Armenia, Georgia, Iran, China, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Russia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India, Egypt, Chile, Israel, Finland, Denmark, China, Japan, Canada, Mexico, France, Norway, Sweden, South Korea, Palestine, and other African and South American countries countries and immigrant diaspora throughout the world including in the USA. 

Fermentations and Cultures Event Hosts: Payal Shah, Nickawanna Shaw, Marika Groen, Anton Nicola, Permian Khosravi, Ebonee McClurvey, Kirsten Shockey, Connie Chew, Dr. Johnny Drain, Maria Mantilla, Ken Fornataro, Alex Gunuey, Zoe Mitchell, Dave Smoke-McCluskey, Amy Kalafa, and Ed Ferrada.



Ferments and Cultures


We recorded the live event and are editing the Tips for Filming your Ferments and Cultures video for distribution to all our program and event hosts working with confirmed and potential presenters. We also hope to create a guide that we intend to distribute to all program participants as well.

Our objective, described at length during the live event, is to get as many people as possible to view this really inspiring work. Hopefully you will enjoin what we call, as you will hear, a movement for food, land, and water equality and respect for the Earth as demonstrated through different cultures and areas around the world.


This program covers fermentation, preservation, increasing food resources, science, traditional and novel applications of microbes, food justice, soil development, farming, fungus and bacteria as environmental tools, waste management, land and water access and the preparation of food and drink through fermentation, preparation and cooking techniques. We recognize that some people are not actually interested in some of these topics, so we clearly make which videos are about fermentation, preparation and cooking techniques.

Event event has a specific focus often a geographic region that includes cultures, foods, drinks and techniques from Armenia, Georgia, Iran, China, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Russia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India, Egypt, Chile, Israel, Finland, Denmark, China, Japan, Canada, Mexico, France, Norway, Sweden, South Korea, Palestine, and other African and South American countries countries and immigrant diaspora throughout the world including in the USA. 

Fermentations and Cultures Event Hosts: Payal Shah, Nickawanna Shaw, Marika Groen, Anton Nicola, Permian Khosravi, Ebonee McClurvey, Kirsten Shockey, Connie Chew, Dr. Johnny Drain, Maria Mantilla, Ken Fornataro, Alex Gunuey, Zoe Mitchell, Dave Smoke-McCluskey, Amy Kalafa, and Ed Ferrada.


All the Events

The events of this program serve as an education resource, and a guide to like minded individuals throughout the world. So if you have not requested an invitation to present at one of our events, or answered an invitation, would you please? To get a highly discounted Season Pass please go here.



Mara Jane King will not appear until our final event of the program, but you can still join her and Christine Ruch for a really super fundraising event! “In this time of reduced social interaction, the Festival brings people together over a topic that has everything to do with connection and community: food. Just as the food industry is reeling, the 501c3 nonprofit Flatirons Food Film Festival could also use your help. To enable the 2020 Flatirons Food Film Festival (Oct. 8-11) to contribute again to our country’s ongoing dialog about food, your support for fundraisers like this one is more important than ever. And what’s better than having fun while donating.”

Season Pass for Ferments and Cultures

For the first event of Ferments and Cultures on August 6 we are airing proprietary films, and a tutorial as well. Whether or not you can attend the live part of that event, people are not going to be able to access any of that after that event ends. This is being filmed, and will not be made available to the public until the end of the year. You can buy a Season Pass for all of the scheduled events. https://conta.cc/3k5Xp5V


Sesame shio-koji flatbread

Events in this program of 15 planned events will cover fermentation, preservation, increasing food resources, science, traditional/novel applications of microbes, soil development, farming, fungus and bacteria as environmental tools, waste management, and international cultures. Or just how someone feels about eating.

Each event has a specific focus often a geographic region that includes cultures, foods, drinks and techniques from Armenia, Georgia, Iran, China, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Russia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India, Egypt, Chile, Israel, Finland, Denmark, China, Japan, Canada, Mexico, France, Norway, Sweden, South Korea, Palestine, and other African and South American countries countries and immigrant diaspora throughout the world including in the USA. 

Fermentations and Cultures Event Hosts are Payal Shah, Nickawanna Shaw, Marika Groen, Anton Nicola, Permian Khosravi, Ebonee McClurvey, Kirsten Shockey, Connie Chew, Dr. Johnny Drain, Maria Mantilla, Ken Fornataro, Alex Gunuey, Zoe Mitchell, Dave Smoke-McCluskey, Amy Kalafa, and Ed Ferrada. They facilitate what the program hosts,. and what they are into for the following events. There are many presenters in each category that will be announced ned as the event draws nearer.


Pickles from Petra and The Beast

Scheduled Events

Unless otherwise noted the 3 hour live part of each event takes place from 2:30 PM EST to 5:30 PM EST. That can change, and should be irrelevant in someone’s decision to participate in an event.

August 24 Koji Making and Pickles – Event Host Maria Mantilla(Presenters list in formation)

September 13 Fruits, Ferments, Probiotics – Event Host Amy Kalafa(Presenters list in formation)

September 22 French Ferments and Cultures – Event Host Alex Gunuey(Presenters list in formation)

September 28 The Silk Road to Palestine and Israel , including Armenia, Georgia, Iran,  Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India (Halal and Kosher) – Event Host Peiman Khosravi(Presenters list in formation)

October 4 Africa, Alkaline Ferments, Black Soil – Event Host Ebonee McCorvey, Event Host Dr. Johnny Drain(Presenters list in formation)

October 12 Native American and Immigrant Roots (Asia, Africa, Europe, Scandinavia, etc.) – Event Host Dave Smoke McCluskey(Presenters list in formation)

October 25 Vegan Food and Drinks – Event Host Ed Ferrada, Event Host Kirsten Shockey (Presenters list in formation)

November 8 Indian Ferments, Preserves and Cultures Event Host Payal Shah (Presenters list in formation)

November 15 The Caucuses, The Balkans and Russia – Event Host Ken Fornataro (Presenters list in formation)

November 22 Sauces and Pastes (Koji or Enzymes) – Event Host Zoe Mitchell and Event Host Dr.Johnny Drain (Presenters list in formation)

December 4 Japanese Ferments and Cultures – Event Host Marika Groen(Presenters list in formation)

December 14 Baking with Koji, Malts and Syrups – Event Host Anton Nicola (Presenters list in formation)

December 22 Scandinavian Cultures – Event Host Nickawana Shaw(Presenters list in formation)

December 28 China and South East Asia – Event Host Connie Chew(Presenters list in formation)

Season Pass: Ferments and Cultures

All events have a full 7 day viewing period, including an edited recording of the live part of that event available a few days later if the quality meets our standards.. So there is no reason anyone that doesn’t work seven days in a row could not fully participate.

In other words, no one, including presenters or program hosts or event host has to be there during a specified time. That’s why you might want to consider a Season Pass.

A Season Pass is for the program and it’s 14 plus events. Plu. We can’t tell you yet what special adjunct things we have planed that are being worked on. Seasons Pass : https://conta.cc/3k5Xp5V

Season Pass Prices

There are 14 events that we will charge $35 per event to access the videos for seven days, and attend the live part or see an edited version. You can pretty much buy a $35 pass at anytime up to two days before the event actually ends. It would require many hours of video watching if you waited that long.

Depending on when you purchase a Season Pass, here are the prices:

* First tier Tickets: USD $157 until August 11 until at 11PM EST
* Second Tier Tickets USD $197 until August 21at 11 PM EST
* Third Tier Tickets USD $247 until 13 September 11PM EST

We will not keep track of what events you attend but will know if you show up. If you miss a specific event no recordings nor makeups after the 7 day period will be available. We will not refund a partial amount of the fee for any reason. You get no credit for a missed event, so should something become available in the future (see below), it would cost you.

If a Season Pass is of interest – we’ll throw in the August 6 event as well but that means you have roughly 48 hours to respond for that lagniappe – act now. If you are reading this after that date, you missed it. But a program or event host might make parts available to potential presenters.



Objectives

The special sessions we have planned will also serve as an education resource, and a guide to like minded individuals throughout the world. Obviously that will required data entry and communications time.

It seems that breakout groups with very specific interests always form when we have an event. This time, we have a protocol on how to make sure these last and become ongoing members of culturesgroup.

After the entire events are over we hope to create a book and a documentary for sale that benefits all the presenters and volunteer staff for the entire event. And, hopefully, those that participate will benefit from a higher profile, and possible sales.

So if you have not requested an invitation to present at one of our events, or answered an invitation, it would be helpful if you did so as lead time for these events is long.


Mailing List: https://conta.cc/30SSPiv


Ferments and Cultures


Event Registration: https://conta.cc/2X2xdzo

Events in this 15 part program will cover fermentation, preservation, increasing food resources, science, traditional/novel applications of microbes, soil development, farming, fungus and bacteria as environmental tools, waste management, and international cultures that include foods, drinks and traditions from Armenia, Georgia, Iran, China, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Russia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India, Israel, Finland, Denmark, China, Japan, Mexico, France, Norway, Sweden, Korea, Palestine, African and South American and North American countries and indigenous people and immigrant diaspora throughout the world including the USA. 

The program Starts August 6 – Register here. You can register up until August 6th for the first event, but you should probably do it by August 4th! Thank You!

Jessica Alonzo of Petra and The Beast in Dallas, Texas demonstrates two types of rice amasake she uses based on what type of fruit or vegetable she is using. This is a great video, and a good example of one of the newer videos we are making of all presenters for the series. You record the raw footage, we edit and place titles, recipes, pictures of books or products, etc. Cucumber Kasuzuke from Petra and The Beast

This event includes some new videos edited from raw footage submitted by presenters. The third and last hour of the meeting 3PM to 4PM EST will be devoted exclusively to video making.  1 to 4 PM EST , August 6 Live Event. $30 USD Videos, and Chat in English, (preguntas y repuestas en Español en chat) Program Hosts and Presenters (both confirmed or invited) must ask for entry codes unless purchasing tickets.  Event Registration


Sesame koji paste for Armenia style flatbreads for our Silk Road, Halal and Kosher Event

24 hours before the event watch at https://conta.cc/2DfBTuI. The 3 hour live part of the takes place 24 hours after that start time of August 5, 1 PM EST. 

Go to registration page, purchase a ticket or use code to access. You’ll receive a passcode for the live event 24 hours before the event. 

In this 24 hour showing is the world premiere of the first five episodes of Season 1 of Cultured&Cured: Asian Fermentation with Chef Ken Fornataro



The last hour of the August 6 event: Video Presentation Assistance Q & A with award-winning TV producer, Amy Kalafa. How to create a video with recording tips from a professional. Join hundreds of presenters from around the world. 


Green Mango with Lime and Salt, and a ripe mango 2nd ferment Water Kefir

Events in this 15 part program will cover fermentation, preservation, increasing food resources, science, traditional/novel applications of microbes, soil development, farming, fungus and bacteria as environmental tools, waste management, and international cultures that include foods, drinks and traditions from Armenia, Georgia, Iran, China, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Russia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India, Israel, Finland, Denmark, China, Japan, Mexico, France, Norway, Sweden, Korea, Palestine, African and South American and North American countries and indigenous people and immigrant diaspora throughout the world including the USA. 

Event Registration: https://conta.cc/2X2xdzo

Mailing List: https://conta.cc/30SSPiv


Super Powers – Rice Koji with R.oryzae and A.oryzae


An in depth discussion of how to grow koji on fragrant long grain rice using a combination of A.oryzae and R. oryzae cultures or spores from these filamentous fungi.

In the coming weeks we will be publishing quite a few recipes that use this super enzyme charged rice! Using this you can both preserve and extend and improve the life and quality of what you eat.

Perfectly Steamed Rice Yearning for Spores

Kojify All the Things with All The Spores!


A discussion of all the things you can make koji on. With All The Spores.

Make koji using A oryzae, or combined Rhizopus oryzae and A.oryzae for koji or tempeh. Also, intro to make koji on green coffee, chocolate, toasted rice, rice flakes, soy grits, corn bran and more.


Three Misos


We made a big batch of basic miso – over a gallon – using converted brown rice and canned organic chick peas. It’s very tasty, easy and inexpensive. As is, it makes a great basic miso. It’s also gluten free and contains no soy products.

However, we added some really special ingredients to it to make 3 different kinds of miso. It’s something we like to do when we make miso. If you have the base, why not create variety? So we made a black garlic miso, a koji cured bacon miso, and a truffle shio-koji miso.

Roasted dried mushrooms of any type work really well if you can’t get truffles. You can add just about anything to it, including dried or partially dried vegetables, or even dried fish.

This is a 4 part series. If you have any questions or think something was left out let us know.


  • 2700 grams rice koji (koji recipe)
  • 5 cups or 850 grams canned chick peas, cooked and drained
  • 2 1/2 cups or 385 grams of coarse sea salt
  • 1 cup or 150 grams of black garlic
  • 1/4 pound or 106 grams cooked bacon (koji cured preferred, but smoked is okay)
  • 1/4 cup truffle shio koji (or dried mushroom powder)

After you have bought or made your rice koji, grind it up if dried or mash with the salt while still fresh and slightly warm. Let sit for an hour or more, then add in the cooked and very well drained garbanzo beans. The beans should have been pressure steamed for 10 minutes, or just heartily boiled for about 15 minutes.

If you mash up the beans before hand they will easily mix with the rice. As you mix, the water inside the beans will make it so that no additional liquid is necessary. After mixing, let sit covered for up to 48 hours at room temperature before remixing and packing it into a container. You could also just pack your miso into a container straight away.


Quick Box Koji



Powdered Rice Koji. It’s a thing. A Smart Thing.

  • 5 pound bag of parboiled rice
  • 1 tsp Aspergillus oryzae

We had a leftover, heavy cardboard box that was the perfect size for making rice koji in. We took a 5 pound bag of parboiled rice and rice it off very well. We then put it in a preheated 350F oven in a stainless steel container. The rice was well wrapped with foil to prevent dryness or steam escape.

As soon as we put the rice in the oven we turned it off and let the rice sit undisturbed for 12 hours. It easily fluffed up and was cooked but not at all mushy. We then added a teaspoon of Aspergillus oryzae (tane koji spores) and grew the koji out on the rice. We then made 3 different types of miso from the koji.


Awasemiso

Some people actually start off to make miso with an eye towards using some or all of that miso at a later date, typically to blend with another miso. A blended miso is called an awasemiso.


Awasemiso

We considered awasemisos as a way to build layers of flavor. Let’s say you took a sweet red miso and blended it with a mellow white miso. Is there a way you could have just made that blended miso from the start?

You could get pretty close, but why would you lessen the number of miso types you had to chose from? You couldn’t unblend it if you wanted to use mellow white miso.



That’s why we try to always create distinct items that can be blended with something else, or have something added to some of it to create a new item. Although this onion awasemiso is a blended miso, it can still be considered a distinct item.

You can use it just about any way that you would use chicken soup if you added some to hot water. You could use it just like you would a chicken bouillon cube.

Take a tablespoon of this miso and add iot to an oil and vinegar dressing, or a cup of mayonnaise. Then dress greens, or steamed vegetables or a pasta salad with it. Mix it wit buttter and use it as a bread sprea. Or like a compond butter.


  • 1 cup or 154 grams kosher salt
  • 2 cups or 180 grams dried onions
  • 3 cups or 552 grams ground rice koji
  • 18 – 20 cups or 4000 grams miso

This recipe combines multiple techniques such as slow baking (or sun dehydrating) a miso for several days, or even freezing it when you want to stop it’s fermentation. We used baked corn and aged corn misos. You don’t need additional. Just keep mixing the miso.



If you start off with a wheat and soybean free base, like we did here, everything you create from there on out can be wheat and soybean free. If that’s not a concern, use soybeans. It’s very hard to beat the protein content of soybeans, although some people prefer garbanzo beans.

After a while, most misos and soy sauces begin to taste the same. That’s why we always have shio-koji on hand as well. Because that, too, can be blended with a miso to make a really spectacular awasemiso. Or used instead of miso if you don’t want that miso taste.

Taste. That’s another reason why we like awasemisos so much. Let’s say you have a 3 month old miso that you had planned to cure for 9 months. At 3 months most misos taste pretty good. A little young and not quite ready maybe, but still tasty.

Specialty misos made with roasted corn, for example, really taste like fresh corn. At 9 months the fresh corn taste might turn into s more mature deep taste that isn’t so corn forward. So why not bake or sun dry some of that, and add some older corn miso, thereby memorializing that young corn taste?

That’s what we do here. But we also do something that makes it more of a namemiso. We add more ground up rice koji, and in this case lots of dried onions.

In 30 days, this will be a explosively tasty miso that will make anything you put it in be several times tastier than it was before. And it will be ready to do that for whatever you have on hand.

Have some fresh gardens vegetables. Wash, trim them and remove some of the water from them if you like by salting them down. Add some miso, and possibly some vinegar or oil. We do that with fresh tomatoes all the time.

When you aren’t really sure what you’ll have access to, having this suoer tasty miso on hand makes whatever you can get taste great, and be super nutritious as well.

五味 – The Five Flavors

The taste of Sour is associated with Spring (and one of the five elements, Wood).  Sour foods are said to be good for the liver and gall bladder. Vinegar, sauerkraut and other lactofermented foods, citrus fruits, and sourdough bread are classified as sour foods. 

Chef Ken Fornataro will discuss food and beverages based on the principles of five elements traditional Chinese medicine, and the five tastes. A specific organ or organ system of the human body is nourished by each of these tastes. Each taste has either warming or cooling energy, as well as a season.

Combining one or more of these tastes, like adding lemon or ginger to a piece of fried fish, creates compelling taste sensations while balancing the body’s energies. 

Ken’s Instagram virtual event on April 19th from 6 to 6:45 will include ways to create these flavors using cultures, alone or in combination:

  • Aspergillus (chhu or koji) and other filamentous fungus types grown on substrates including rice, millet, wheat, chocolate, mushrooms, seaweed, meats, fish, brans and bogassa
  • Rhizopus grown on rice, corn, fruits, fish, nuts, shellfish, squash, beans and other vegetables to make interesting fermented, preserved and inoculated foods and beverages such as #miso, baking flours, amino sauces and pastes, wines and other unique beverages.
  • Enzymes, Bacteria, Acids, and Yeasts, including malts, isolated out to create cultures to make functional and filling foods and beverages. For example, specific enzymes that come from koji can make doboroku, a country style sake, as well as barley malt or rice syrup.

Using these cultures, Ken will demonstrate how we create the five flavors by making five dishes that combine one or more of these cultures to make different types of kojis, misos, sauces, pastry and pickles.


  • Chocolate koji, corn, chipotle, and pickled onion mole
  • Peanut Koji and Sweet Shrimp Kecap Manis
  • Double fermented baked awasemiso
  • Tempeh and red pepper shoyu
  • White Soy Sauce with koji cured mushrooms

Ken Fornataro appearing at the Florida Fermentation Fest
We’ll have lots of recipes and additional videos at https://www.a-ray.tv/work-in-progress-cultured-cured and at https://Cultures.Group for those who send us their contact info including mailing address. Because you never know what really cool thing will arrive in the mail. 

Ken will demonstrate tasty, functional, medicinal, balancing, and strengthening food and beverages based on the principles of five elements traditional Chinese medicine, and the five tastes that have underlined all the worlds greatest cuisines for over ten thousand years. In combination, the above categories can create amazing, layered taste sensations.

Ken’s Instagram virtual event on April 19th from 6 to 6:45 presentation will briefly discuss:

  • Aspergillus (chhü or koji) and other filamentous fungus types grown on things (substrates) including rice, millet, wheat, chocolate, mushrooms, seaweed, meats, fish, brans, and bogassa to make fermented, preserved and inoculated foods, beverages, baked goods, pickles, sweets, and condiments.
  • Rhizopus grown on rice, corn, fruits, fish, nuts, shellfish, squash, beans, and other vegetables to make interesting fermented, preserved and inoculated foods and beverages such as tempeh, baking flours, misos, amino sauces and pastes, wines and other unique beverages.
  • Enzymes, Acids, Bacteria, and Yeasts, including malts, isolated out to create cultures to make functional and filling foods and beverages that are tasty as well as easier to make. For example, we’ll use specific amylase enzymes that come from rice koji to make doboroku, a country style sake. You could also just use the rice, but this is an example of the conveniences created by science.

Corn with A.sojae
Mixed Filamentous Fungus Corn Mochi Koji for Shoyu

As promised, we will further discuss the physiology of taste, and the receptors that influence how and how much we taste and smell, but also health. Combination therapy is the key. Properly balanced or combined as demonstrated in the food and drinks we describe, new flavors are unlocked, and new tasted are unbound. 

In the last 100 years spectacular advances in food microbiology have demonstrated how traditional techniques were well reasoned out. They worked in the context of the place they were made in. They provide a roadmap to adjust to ever changing resources and food supply and accessibility issues, climate change and cultural changes. 



We hope to be able to show you how to make many different types of koji, jiangs, soy sauce, shrimp miso, green tomatillo ketchup, koji and rhizopus cured coffee, manis kecap, tempeh flours, pickles, fruit and herb shrubs, malted sweets, and fermented chocolate breads. If we don’t have time, you’ll see recipes and hopefully videos for these very soon.

Always with an eye on affordability, accessibility and functionality. 


With
@sunshineandmicrobes
@hanihoneycompany
 @stpeteferments
@kirstenkshockey
@contrabandferments
@sarah_c_owens 
@sandorkraut
@fermentationonwheels
@theblacksheepschool
@goenfermentedfoods
@rgbpurafermentacion 
@zukemono
@kombuchakamp 
@rootkitchens
@awakenkombucha
@gystmpls
@culturesgroup
 @flyingboatbrewing